Cloze Test and Vocabulary For IBPS Clerk Mains: 9th January 2019

English Language Quiz For IBPS Clerk Mains 

IBPS had conducted the IBPS Clerk Prelims Exam few weeks ago and the result will be out shortly. Now the next step is to clear the mains exam Thus, the English Language can be an impetus for their success by helping them save crucial time and score good points in lesser time and effort. So, instead of boiling the ocean, try building up a strong vocabulary, an effective knowledge of grammar, and efficient comprehension skills so as to be on the ball to face this particular section. Here is a quiz on English Language being provided by Adda247 to let you practice the best of latest pattern English Questions for IBPS Clerk Mains Exam.


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Directions (1-10): In the passage given below there are blanks which are numbered from 1 to 10. They are to be filled with the options given below the passage against each of the respective numbers. Find out the appropriate word in each case which can most suitably complete the sentence without altering its meaning. . If none of the words given in options fits in, mark ‘None of these’ as your answer choice. 



Q1. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.



Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

support
undermine
enhance
frustrating
Both (a) and (b)
Solution:
Undermine: lessen the effectiveness, power, or ability of, especially gradually or insidiously.

Q2. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

pulped
grasped
grappled
Both (b) and (c)
divluged
Solution:
Pulp: withdraw (a publication) from the market and recycle the paper.

Q3. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

disengaged
secede
Both (a) and (b)
quailed
resurrected
Solution:
Resurrect: revive or revitalize (something that is inactive, disused, or forgotten).

Q4. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

entreat
Both (a) and (c)
invoked
effect
relied
Solution:
Invoke: call earnestly for.

Q5. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

Both (b) and (e)
inundate
rewarding
obsequious
punitive
Solution:
Punitive: inflicting or intended as punishment.

Q6. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

assisting
decent
malicious
blatant
Both (a) and (b)
Solution:
Malicious: characterized by malice; intending or intended to do harm.

Q7. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

enlarging
curtail
diminishing
Both (a) and (b)
addle
Solution:
Curtail: reduce in extent or quantity; impose a restriction on.

Q8. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

enmity
collateral
Both (a) and (d)
triumph
deception
Solution:
Enmity: a state or feeling of active opposition or hostility.

Q9. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

looming
Both (d) and (e)
jerking
tweak
goad
Solution:
Tweak: a fine adjustment to a mechanism or system.

Q10. Literary freedom is taken for granted in democracies, but forces that threaten or (1)……………………. it are always at work. Each age has to fight the battle afresh. In recent times, several attempts to get books withdrawn, (2)……………………… or sanitised of offending content have achieved full or partial success in India. Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History was withdrawn from circulation, and A.K. Ramanujan’s essay ‘Three Hundred Ramayanas’ was dropped from a Delhi University syllabus. Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s Madhorubagan (One Part Woman) was withdrawn by the author under mob pressure but (3)………………………….. by a Madras High Court verdict. Public order, national unity and social or religious harmony are the principles commonly (4)………………. against the practice of literary freedom. Threats to free expression, especially artistic freedom, in our times mainly come from those claiming to espouse the interests of a particular religion or social group. It is in this context that Shashi Tharoor, Congress MP and writer, has introduced a private member’s Bill in the Lok Sabha seeking to protect freedom of literature. Its objective — that “authors must be guaranteed the freedom to express their work without fear of (5)…………………….. action by the State or by sections of society” — commends itself to any society that upholds liberal values. It seeks the omission of three IPC sections, including 295A, in effect a non-denominational blasphemy law, as it targets deliberate or (6)……………………….. acts to outrage religious feelings.


Section 295A is a grossly misused section, often invoked in trivial ways to hound individuals, harass writers and (7)……………….. free expression. It deserves to be scrapped. Sections that relate to the sale of obscene books and uttering words that hurt religious feelings are also sought to be omitted. However, it is unclear why Section 153A, which punishes those who promote (8)……………….. between groups on grounds of religion, race or language, and Section 153B, which criminalises words and imputations prejudicial to national integration, do not draw Mr. Tharoor’s attention. In the process of proscribing a book, he proposes a (9)…………………….. in the form of a 15-day prohibition. Thereafter, the onus should be on the State government to approach the High Court to seek a permanent ban. It favours the scrapping of the provision in the Customs Act to ban the import of books, but makes a public order exception. Private Bills rarely become law, but they are useful in highlighting gaps in the body of law. Seen in this light, Mr. Tharoor’s initiative is most welcome as a step towards removing or diluting penal provisions that (10)………………….. literary freedom.

Both (b) and (d)
catapult
awaken
inhibit
coup
Solution:
Inhibit: hinder, restrain, or prevent (an action or process).

Directions (11-15): In each of the questions below, there is a word given in bold which is followed by five options. In each of the options, a pair of words is given which is either the pair of synonyms or antonyms or synonym & antonym of the word given in bold. Choose that pair as your answer. 



Q11. Dire

Promote: Boost
Dreadful, appalling
Fanatic: Enthusiast
Intense: Depth
Disconcert: Perturb
Solution:
Option (b) is the most appropriate choice.
Dire- extremely serious or urgent
Dreadful- causing or involving great suffering, fear, or unhappiness; extremely bad or serious
Fanatic means a person filled with excessive and single-minded zeal, especially for an extreme religious or political cause.
Enthusiast means a person who is very interested in a particular activity or subject.
Disconcert means disturb the composure of; unsettle.
Perturb means make (someone) anxious or unsettled.
Hence the set of words in option (b) share the relationship of being the synonyms of the word ‘dire’ and to each other. Hence option (b) is the correct answer choice.

Q12. Elicited
Confiscation: Requisition
Extract, evoke
Acclaim: Exalt
Frugal: Parsimonious
Friendly: Comradely
Solution:
Elicited- evoke or draw out (a reaction, answer, or fact) from someone
Hence the set of words in option (b) share the relationship of being the synonyms of the word ‘Elicited’ and to each other.
Confiscation means the action of taking or seizing someone’s property with authority; seizure.
Requisition means a formal written demand that something should be performed or put into operation.
Exalt means Think or speak very highly of (someone or something)
Frugal means sparing or economical about money or food.
Parsimonious means very unwilling to spend money or use resources.
Comradely means friendly, amiable.

Q13. Mooted
Despicable: Abhorrent
Deceitful: Disingenuous
Cognizant: apprised
Broach, mention
Critic: Writer
Solution:
Mooted- raise (a question or topic) for discussion; suggest (an idea or possibility)
Option (d) is the most suitable choice as the answer of the question.
The set of words in option (d) share the relationship of being synonyms to the word given in bold.
Despicable means deserving hatred and contempt.
Abhorrent means inspiring disgust and loathing; repugnant.
Deceitful means guilty of or involving deceit; deceiving or misleading others.
Disingenuous means not candid or sincere, typically by pretending that one knows less about something than one really does.
Cognizant means having knowledge or awareness.
Apprised means informed or told.
Critic means a person who expresses an unfavorable opinion of something.

Q14. Espouse
Flexible: Intransigent
Shallow: Insubstantial
Adopt, reject
Authoritative: Authentic
Fatal: Lethal
Solution:
Espouse- adopt or support (a cause, belief, or way of life).
Option (c) is the correct answer as the pair of words in option (c) share the relationship of being the synonym and antonym to the word given in bold.
Flexible means able to be easily modified to respond to altered circumstances.
Intransigent means unwilling or refusing to change one’s views or to agree about something.
Shallow means of little depth Insubstantial means lacking strength and solidity.
Authoritative means commanding and self-confident; likely to be respected and obeyed.
Authentic means of undisputed origin and not a copy; genuine.
Fatal means causing death. Lethal means sufficient to cause death.

Q15. Frantic
Berserk, placid
Furtive: Sly
Meddle: Interfere
Taint: Spoil
Vicinity: Proximity
Solution:
Frantic- distraught with fear, anxiety, or other emotion
Berserk- out of control with anger or excitement; wild or frenzied
Option (a) is the correct answer as the pair of words in option (a) shares the relationship of being the synonym and antonym to the word given in bold.
Furtive means attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive.
Sly means having or showing a cunning and deceitful nature.
Meddle means Interfere in something that is not ones concern.
Taint means something with a contaminating influence or effect.
Vicinity means the area near or surrounding a particular place.
Proximity means Nearness in space, time, or relationship.

               

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