SBI PO English Language Quiz: 28th April

SBI PO English Language Quiz: 28th April




sbi- english- quiz



English Quiz For SBI PO Exam 2019

The State Bank of India conducts a three-level examination to recruit Probationary Officers every year. Thus, the English Language can be an impetus for your success as it helps you save crucial time and score good points in lesser time and effort. So, instead of boiling the ocean, try building up a strong vocabulary, an effective knowledge of grammar, and efficient comprehension skills so as to be on the ball to face this particular section. Here is a quiz on English Language being provided by Adda247 to let you practice the best of latest pattern English Questions for SBI PO Examination 2019-20.





Directions (1-10): In the passage given below there are blanks which are numbered from 1 to 10. They are to be filled with the options given below the passage against each of the respective numbers. Find out the appropriate word in each case which can most suitably complete the sentence without altering its meaning. 

Q1. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
eliminating
eliminate
eliminates
diminish
None of the above
Solution:
'Eliminates' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q2. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
culprits
culprit
malice
eliminators
None of the above
Solution:
'Culprits' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q3. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
associating
collaboration
collaborating
associates
None of the above
Solution:
'Collaboration' is the correct fit for the blank and it means to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor.

Q4. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
docile
due
context
ambient
None of the above
Solution:
'Ambient' is the correct fit for the blank and it means an encompassing atmosphere. Example: meteorologists study ambient pressure, air, or temperature.

Q5. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
mitigates
mitigating
remove
removes
None of the above
Solution:
'Mitigating' is the correct fit for the blank and it means to cause to become less harsh or hostile.

Q6. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
expected
expect
accepted
accept
None of the above
Solution:
'Expected' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q7. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
reaches
marks
points
pointed
None of the above
Solution:
'Pointed' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q8. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
Astound
Surprise
Surprisingly
Aghast
None of the above
Solution:
'Surprisingly' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q9. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
Simultaneous
Correspond
corresponding
sided
None of the above
Solution:
'Corresponding' is the correct fit for the blank.

Q10. India can achieve its air quality goals if it completely ------------1----------- emissions from household sources. A recent study has pointed out that the use of firewood, kerosene and coal in the households contributed to about 40% of the PM 2.5 pollution in the Gangetic basin districts. This number varied across the country but household emissions remained one of the major ---------2---------- behind air pollution. The analysis was carried out by researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi in -------------3-------------- with University of California in Berkeley, Urban Emissions, Delhi and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
The results showed that by eliminating household emissions the average outdoor air pollution levels could be reduced and brought within the national ------------4----------- air quality standards. The paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science also notes that “if all households transitioned to clean fuels, about 13% of premature mortality in India could be averted.” At the national scale, ----------5----------- household emissions is also ----------6--------- to bring large health benefits.
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses are burning dirty fuel every day. We have realised that pollution may start in the kitchen, but it doesn’t stay there... it becomes part of the general outdoor air pollution,” said Kirk R. Smith from UC Berkeley in a release. He is one of the corresponding authors of the paper. Using satellite data and chemical transport model simulations, the researchers ---------7--------- out that complete mitigation would bring down the country's average annual PM 2.5 air pollution to 38 microgram/cubic metre. ------------8-----------, this is below India's national ambient air quality standard of 40 microgram/cubic metre and slightly above the World Health Organization (interim target 1) standards of 35 microgram/cubic metre.
“In many villages, they still use firewood for room heating and water heating. People prefer cheap wood fuel despite LPG being provided to many households,” says Sourangsu Chowdhury, a Ph.D. scholar at IIT Delhi and the first author of the paper. Sagnik Dey from the Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, and one of the -------------9------------ authors, warns: “In Delhi NCR, stubble burning, industrial and power plant emission, brick kilns and vehicular emissions are the major contributors. Even after mitigating household emissions, Delhi NCR would remain out of attainment. It needs more serious and --------10------------- measures.”
benign
rigorously
ensure
stringent
None of the above
Solution:
'Stringent' is the correct fit for the blank and it means marked by rigor, strictness, or severity especially with regard to rule or standard.

Directions (11-15): In each Question below, a sentence is given with four words given in Bold in the sentence. Among these bold words one may be wrongly spelt or incorrectly used with respect to the context of the sentence. The option of that word is the answer. If all four words are correctly spelt or used mark (e). i.e. 'All Correct' as the answer. 

Q11. Sighting of new species of birds on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands has going up since the 2004 Indonesian tsunami, say researchers of the ZSI.
Sighting
has
going
since
All Correct
Solution:
'Going' is inappropriately used here. It should be 'gone' instead of 'going'. If we were to use 'going' in the sentence it should be followed by 'been': "has been going up".

Q12. During their migration from north to south, birds make a stopover at the Andaman and Nicobar islands.
During
migration
make
stopover
All Correct
Solution:
All Correct

Q13. The feed-fast cycle is an important aspect of our body metbolism.
cycle
important
body
metbolism
All Correct
Solution:
'Metabolism' is the correct spelling here.

Q14. The liver is a central organ in maintain glucose and fat metabolism both under fed and fasted conditions.
maintain
both
under
conditions
All Correct
Solution:
'Maintain' is inappropriately used here. It should be 'maintaining' instead of 'maintain' since the sentence is in present continuous tense.

Q15. During a fasting state, liver produces glucose in a process which is critical for maintaining circulating glucose levels.
fasting
produces
critical
circulating
All Correct
Solution:
All Correct

               





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