Saturday, 17 June 2017

IBPS PO 2017 के लिए ट्विस्टेड वन अंग्रेजी की प्रश्नोतरी

Twisted One English For IBPS PO 2017

प्रिय छात्र, English Section bank exams लेने वाले उम्मीदवारों के लिए कठिन विषय है. हालांकि अनुशासन और सही दृष्टिकोण के साथ अवधारणा और नियम पहले कठिन हो सकते है, हालांकि इन अवधारणाओं को समझना और प्रश्नों में प्रयोग करना कठिन नहीं है.  हम आपको Sentence Correction section of bank exams सभी प्रकार के high-level questions प्रदान करेंगे.

Direction (1-5): Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options. choose the one that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

Q1. I am sometimes attacked for imposing ‘rules’. Nothing could be further from the truth. I hate rules. All I do is report on how consumers react to different stimuli. I may say to a copywriter, — “Research shows that commercials with celebrities are below average in persuading people to buy products. Are you sure you want to use a celebrity?”. Call that a rule? Or I may say to an art director, “Research suggests that if you set the copy in black type on a white background, more people will read it than if you set it in white type on a black background.”

(a) Guidance based on applied research can hardly qualify as ‘rules’.
(b) Thus, all my so-called ‘rules’ are rooted in applied research.
(c) A suggestion perhaps, but scarcely a rule.
(d) Such principles are unavoidable if one wants to be systematic about consumer behaviour.
(e) None of these

Q2. Relations between the factory and the dealer are distant and usually strained as the factory tries to force cars on the dealers to smooth out production. Relations between the dealer and the customer are equally strained because dealers continuously adjust prices to make deals to adjust demand with supply while maximizing profits. This becomes a system marked by a lack of long-term commitment on either side, which maximizes feelings of mistrust. In order to maximize their bargaining positions, everyone holds back information: the dealer about the product and the consumer about his true desires.

(a) As a result, ‘deal making’ becomes rampant, without concern for customer satisfaction.
(b) As a result, inefficiencies creep into the supply chain.
(c) As a result, everyone treats the other as an adversary, rather than as an ally.
(d) As a result, everyone loses in the long run.
(e) None of these 

Q3. In the evolving world order, the comparative advantage of the United States lies in its military force. Diplomacy and international law have always been regarded as annoying encumbrances, unless they can be used to advantage against an enemy. Every active player in world affairs professes to seek only peace and to prefer negotiation to violence and coercion.

(a) However, diplomacy has often been used as a mask by nations which intended to use force.
(b) However, when the veil is lifted, we commonly see that diplomacy is understood as a disguise for the rule of force.
(c) However, History has shown that many of these nations do not practice what they profess.
(d) However, History tells us that peace is professed by those who intend to use violence.
(e) None of these 

Q4. Age has a curvilinear relationship with the exploitation of opportunity. Initially, age will increase the likelihood that a person will exploit an entrepreneurial opportunity because people gather much of the knowledge necessary to exploit opportunities over the course of their lives, and because age provides credibility in transmitting that information to others. However, as people become older, their willingness to bear risks declines, their opportunity costs rise, and they become less receptive to new information.

(a) As a result, people transmit more information rather than experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
(b) As a result, people are reluctant to experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
(c) As a result, only people with lower opportunity costs exploit opportunity when they reach an advanced age.
(d) As a result, people become reluctant to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities when they reach an advanced age.
(e) None of these 

Q5. We can usefully think of theoretical models as maps, which help us navigate unfamiliar territory. The most accurate map that it is possible to construct would be of no practical use whatsoever, for it would be an exact replica, on exactly the same scale, of the place where we were. Good maps pull out the most important features and throw away a huge amount of much less valuable information. Of course, maps can be bad as well as good witness the attempts by medieval Europe to produce a map of the world. In the same way, a bad theory, no matter how impressive it may seem in principle, does little or nothing to help us understand a problem.

(a) But good theories, just like good maps, are invaluable, even if they are simplified.
(b) But good theories, just like good maps, will never represent unfamiliar concepts in detail.
(c) But good theories, just like good maps, need to balance detail and feasibility of representation.
(d) But good theories, just like good maps, are accurate only at a certain level of abstraction.
(e) None of these 

Directions (6-15): Mark the out-of-context sentence for your answer. If all the sentences are logically connected, then select option E as your answer. 

Q6. A. Developed countries, however, devote most of their research funds to the diseases from which their citizens suffer, and that seems likely to continue for the foreseeable future.
B. On which problems should we focus research in medicine and the biological sciences?
C. People in rich countries already can expect to live about 30 years longer that people in the poorest countries.
D. There is a strong argument for tackling the diseases that kill the most people – diseases like malaria, measles, and diarrhea, which kill malaria in developing countries, but very few in the developed world.
(a) only A
(b) A and B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q7. A. Drugs with serious adverse safety profiles are used to treat potentially fatal conditions – including various forms of cancer, inflammatory arthritis, and HIV – because they ultimately help more than they hurt.
B. Moreover, drug safety is a leading factor in determining how medicines are regulated.
C. Rather than assess a medicine’s safety in isolation, its adverse effects must be considered in relation to its efficacy.
D. In other words, a benefit-risk balance must be struck.
(a) only A
(b) only B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q8. A. And one of the things that struck me as I learned more and more about HIV was how strange epidemics were.
B. The word “Tipping Point,” for example, comes from the world of epidemiology.
C. If you talk to the people who study epidemics – epidemiologists – you realize that they have a strikingly different way of looking at the world.
D. Before I went to work for The New Yorker, I was a reporter for the Washington Post and I covered the AIDS epidemic.
(a) only A
(b) only B
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q9. A. I guess what I’m saying is that I’m not sure that this book fits into any one category.
B. I profile three people who I think embody those types, and then I use the example of Paul Revere and his midnight ride to point out the subtle characteristics of this kind of social epidemic.
C. I think that word of mouth is something created by three very rare and special psychological types, whom I call Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmen.
D. There’s a whole section of the book devoted to explaining the phenomenon of word of mouth, for example.
(a) only A
(b) only B
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q10. A. Much of the African surface is covered by savannas, or open grasslands, and by arid plains and deserts.
B. Africa is a continent of great size, almost 12 million square miles or about three times the size of the United States.
C. We have already noted the origins of humankind in East Africa where some of the earliest fossil remains of protohominids have been found.
D. Most of it lies in the tropics and, although we often think of Africa in terms of its rain forests, less than 10% of the continent is covered by tropical forests, and those are mostly in West Africa.
(a) only A
(b) A and B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q11. A. In these centuries, there were important advances in the aesthetics of nature, including the emergence of the concepts of disinterestedness and the picturesque, as well as the introduction of the idea of positive aesthetics.
B. Although environmental aesthetics has developed as a sub-field of philosophical aesthetics only in the last 40 years, it has historical roots in eighteenth and nineteenth century aesthetics.
C. Thus, by the end of the eighteenth century, there were three clearly distinct ideas each focusing on different aspects of nature’s diverse and often contrasting moods.
D. These notions continue to play a role in contemporary work in environmental aesthetics, especially in the context of its relationship to environmentalism.
(a) only A
(b) A and B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q12. A. But the loss is not only theirs.
B. Unless disadvantaged racial groups are integrated into mainstream social institutions, they will continue to suffer from segregation and discrimination.
C. Current affirmative action debates have lost sight of the ideal of integration as a compelling moral and political goal.
D. It is high time that institutions of higher education forthrightly defend this ideal in its own right.
(a) only A
(b) A and B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q13. A. Not long ago the world’s main worry was that people had too little to eat.
B. In an age of plenty, individuals have the luxury of eating what they like.
C. Persuading children to eat vegetables is hardly a new struggle, nor would it seem to rank high on the list of global priorities.
D. Yet America, for all its libertarian ethos, is now worrying about how its citizens eat and how much exercise they take.
(a) only A
(b) only B
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q14. A. Moreover, for most nations, government debt is projected to grow relative to income for years to come.
B. The popularity of austerity policies has waned over the past several years thanks to evidence that it may have been counterproductive.
C. It is important to remember that there is an absence of evidence that government with their own currencies are too indebted.
D. But many are still worried by the fact that, relative to national income, government debt is now larger in many countries than at any point since WWII.
(a) only A
(b) A and B 
(c) only C 
(d) only D
(e) None of the above 

Q15. A. A thorough understanding of what civilization and culture are, requires knowledge of all the qualities that make up human nature and a full understanding of world history.
B. To be truly world history, an account of the past must not only retell what happened but must also relate events and people to each other.
C. It must inquire into causes and effects.
D. It must try to discern false hood in the old records, such as attempts of kings to make themselves look better than they really were.
(a) only A
(b) only B
(c) only C 
(d) only D
CRACK IBPS PO 2017



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