Friday, 19 May 2017

एसबीआई पीओ और बॉब पीओ 2017 के लिए अंग्रेजी की प्रश्नोतरी

New Pattern English Questions for SBI PO and BOB PO 2017

SBI PO और NIACL Assistant की परीक्षा के लिए अब केवल कुछ ही दिन शेष हैं. यह समय SBI PO Prelims और NIACL Assistant Prelims 2017 की परीक्षा के लिए अपनी तैयारी में तेजी लाने का है. यह अंग्रेजी के प्रश्न आपको BOB PO और NICL AO 2017 recruitment examination में भी बेहतर अंक प्राप्त करने में सहायता करेंगे. हम व्याकरण अनुभाग के लिए study notes भी प्रदान कर रहे है. और आप New Pattern English Questions का भी अभ्यास कर सकते है. 

Directions (1-7): This passage is followed by questions based on its content. After reading passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following this passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.


Some recent historians have argued that life in the British colonies in America from approximately 1763 to 1789 was marked by internal conflicts amount colonists. Inheritors of some of the viewpoints of early twentieth-century progressive historians such as Beard and Becker, these recent historians have put forward arguments that deserve evaluation. The kind of conflict most emphasized by these historians is class conflict. Yet with the Revolutionary War dominating these years, how does one distinguish class conflict within the larger conflict? Certainly not by the side a person supported. Although many of these historians have accepted the earlier assumption that Loyalists represented an upper class, new evidence indicates that Loyalists, like rebels, were drawn from all socio-economic classes. (It is nonetheless probably true that a larger percentage of the well-to-do joined the Loyalists that joined the rebels). Looking at the rebel side, we find little evidence for the contention that lower-class rebels were in conflict with the upper-class rebels. Indeed, the war effort against Britain tended to suppress class conflicts. Where it did not, the disputing rebels of one or another class usually became Loyalists. Loyalism thus operated as a safety valve to remove socio-economic discontent that exist among the rebels.

Disputes occurred, of course, among those who remained on the rebel side, but the extraordinary social mobility of eighteenth century American society (with the obvious exception of slaves) usually prevented such disputes from hardening along class lines. Social structure was in fact so fluid — though recent statistics suggest a narrowing of economic opportunity as the latter half of the century progressed — that to talk about social classes at all requires the use of loose economic categories such as rich, poor, and middle class, or eighteenth-century designations like "he better sort." Despite these vague categories, one should not claim unequivocally that hostility between recognizable classes cannot be legitimately observed. Outside of New York, however, there were very few instances of openly expressed class antagonism.

Having said this, however, one must add that there is much evidence to support the further claim of recent historians that sectional conflicts were common between 1763 and 1789. The “Paxton Boys” incident and the Regulator movement are representative examples of the widespread, and justified, discontent of western settlers against colonial or state governments dominated by eastern interests. Although undertones of class conflict existed beneath such hostility, the opposition was primarily geographical. Sectional conflict which also existed between North and South — deserves further investigation. In summary, historians must be careful about the kind of conflict they emphasize in eighteenth-century America. Yet those who stress the achievement of a general consensus among the colonists cannot fully understand that consensus without understanding the conflicts that had to be overcome or repressed in order to reach it.

Q1. The author considers the contentions made by the recent historians discussed in the passage to be
(a) potentially verifiable.
(b) partially justified.
(c) logically contradictory.
(d) capricious and unsupported.
(e) None of these

Q2. The author most likely refers to “historians such as Beard and Becker” in order to
(a) point out historians whose views of history anticipated some of the views of the recent historians mentioned in the passage.
(b) isolate the two historians whose work is most representative of the viewpoints of Progressive historians.
(c) emphasize the need to find connections between recent historians writing and the work of earlier historians.
(d) suggest that progressive historians were the first to discover the particular internal conflicts in eighteenth-century American life mentioned in the passage.
(e) None of these

Q3. According to the passage, Loyalism during the American Revolutionary War served the function
(a) eliminating the disputes that existed among those colonists who supported the rebel cause.
(b) drawing upper, as opposed to lower, socio-economic classes away from the rebel cause.
(c) absorbing members of socio-economic groups on the rebel side who felt themselves in contention with members of other socio­-economic groups.
(d) channeling conflict that existed within a socio-economic class into the war effort against the rebel cause.
(e) None of these

Q4. The passage suggests that the author would be likely to agree with which of the following statements about the social structure of eighteenth-century American society?
I. It allowed greater economic opportunity than it did social mobility.
II. It permitted greater economic opportunity prior to 1750 and after 1750.
III. It did not contain rigidly defined socioeconomic divisions.
IV. It prevented economic disputes from arising among members of the society.
(a) I and IV only
(b) II and III only
(c) III and IV only
(d) I, II and III only
(e) None of these

Q5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would be most likely to agree with which of the following statements regarding socioeconomic class and support for the rebel and Loyalist causes during the American Revolutionary War?
(a) Identifying a person's socioeconomic class is the least accurate method of ascertaining which side that person supported.
(b) Identifying a person as a member of the rebel or of the Loyalist side does necessarily reveal that person's particular socioeconomic class.
(c) Both the rebel and the Loyalist sides contained members of all socioeconomic classes, although there were fewer disputes among socioeconomic class on the Loyalist side.
(d) Both the rebel and Loyalist sides contained members of all socioeconomic classes, although the Loyalist side was made up primarily of members of the upper class.
(e) None of these

Q6. The author suggests which of the following about representatives of colonial or state governments in America from 1763 to 1789?
(a) The governments inadequately represented the interests of people in western regions.
(b) The governments more often represented class interests than sectional interests.
(c) The governments were less representative than they had been before 1763.
(d) The governments were dominated by the interests of people of an upper socioeconomic class.
(e) None of these

Q7. According to the passage, which of the following is a true statement about sectional conflicts in America between 1763 and 1789?
(a) These conflicts were instigated by eastern interests against western settlers.
(b) These conflicts were the most serious kind of conflict in America.
(c) The conflicts eventually led to openly expressed class antagonism.
(d) These conflicts contained an element of class hostility.
(e) None of these

Directions (8-11): This passage is followed by questions based on its content. After reading passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following this passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.

Many critics of Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights see its second part as a counterpoint that comments on, if does not reverse, the first part, where a “romantic” reading receives more confirmation. Seeing the two parts as a whole is encouraged by the novel’s sophisticated structure, revealed in its complex use of narrators and time shifts. Granted that the presence of these elements need not argue an authorial awareness of novelistic construction comparable to that of Henry James, their presence does encourage attempts to unify the novel’s heterogeneous parts. However, any interpretation that seeks to unify of the novel’s diverse elements is bound to be somewhat unconvincing. This is not because such an interpretation necessarily stiffens into a thesis (although rigidity in any interpretation of this or of any novel is always a danger), but because Wuthering Heights has recalcitrant elements of undesirable power that ultimately, resist inclusion in an all-encompassing interpretation. In this respect, Wuthering Heights shares a feature of Hamlet.

Q8. According to the passage, which of the following is a true statement about the first and second parts of Wuthering Heights?
(a) The second part has received more attention from critics.
(b) The second part has little relation to the first part.
(c) The second part is better because it is more realistic.
(d) The second part provides less substantiation for a “romantic” reading.
(e) None of these

Q9. Which of the following inferences about Henry James’s awareness of novelistic construction is best supported by the passage?
(a) James, more than any other novelist, was aware of the difficulties of novelistic construction.
(b) James was very aware of the details of novelistic construction.
(c) James’s awareness of novelistic construction derived from the reading of Bronte.
(d) James’s awareness of novelistic construction has led most commentators to see unity in his individual novels.
(e) None of these

Q10. The author of the passage would be most likely to agree that an interpretation of a novel should:
(a) not try to unite heterogeneous elements in the novel.
(b) not be inflexible in its treatment of the elements in the novel.
(c) not argue that the complex use of narrators or of time shifts indicates a sophisticated structure.
(d) concentrate on those recalcitrant elements of the novel that are outside the novel’s main structure.
(e) None of these

Q11. The author of the passage suggests which of the following about Hamlet?
I. Hamlet has usually attracted critical interpretations that tend to stiffen into thesis.
II. Hamlet has elements that are not amenable to an all-encompassing critical interpretation.
III. Hamlet is less open to an all-encompassing critical interpretation that is Wuthering Heights.
IV. Hamlet has not received a critical interpretation that has been widely accepted by readers.
(a) I only
(b) II only
(c) I and IV only
(d) I, II and III only
(e) None of these

Directions (12-15): For each of the following questions, a part or the whole of the original sentence has been highlighted in bold. You have to find the best way of writing the underlined part of the sentence. If the bold part is grammatically correct, then choose option A. Option A repeats the bold part.  

Q12. Dr. Pam Saxena, an Indian specialist in drug rehabilitation medicine, advises against going easy on rehabilitated drug addicts for the fear of their relapsing into addiction.

(a) Dr. Pam Saxena, an Indians specialist in drug rehabilitation medicine, advises against going easy on rehabilitated drug addicts
(b) An Indian specialist in drug rehabilitation medicine, Dr. Pam Saxena, advises against going easy on rehabilitated drug addicts
(c) An Indian specialist in drug rehabilitation medicine, Pam Saxena, is of the opinion that one should not go easy on rehabilitated drug addicts
(d) Dr. Pam Saxena, an Indian specialist in drug rehabilitation medicine, advice against going easy on rehabilitated drug addicts
(e) Dr. Pam Saxena, an Indian specialist in drug rehabilitation medicines advises against easy going of rehabilitated drug addicts

Q13. In the fall of 1996, the Indian government dispatched samples of the cells of the militants to those four US scientists, who were only the Americans authorised to test them.

(a) dispatched samples of the cells of the militants to those four US scientists, who were only the Americans authorised to test them.
(b) dispatched samples of the militant’s cells to those four US scientists, the only Americans authorised to test them.
(c) dispatched samples of the cells of militants to those four US scientists who were authorised to test them.
(d) dispatched the samples of the cells of the militants to those four US scientists, who were the only Americans authorised to test them.
(e) dispatched samples of cells of militants to those four US scientists, of the only Americans authorised to test them.

Q14. To prepare himself, he subjected himself to two weeks of total abstinence and intensive training in the open fields of the Panipat, climbing the hills nearby 30 times, spend nights in the open and to test to see how long he could hold out without food.

(a) climbing the hills nearby 30 times, spend nights in the open and to test to see.
(b) climbed the hills nearby 30 times, spending nights in the open and tested to see.
(c) spending nights in the open by climbing the hills nearby 30 times and tested for seeing
(d) climbing the hills nearby 30 times, spending nights in the open and testing to see
(e) climbing the nearby hills 30 times, spend nights in the open and tested to see

Q15. In November 1984, the Vesuvius volcano, started showing seismic activity, and later beginning belching gases, fumes and water and rumbled with the force of millions of tones of molten rock beneath the earth.

(a) started showing seismic activity, and later beginning belching gases, fumes and water and rumbled with
(b) started showing seismic activity, and later began belching gases, fumes and water and rumbling with
(c) showing some seismic activity, and later began belching gases, fumes and water and rumbled with
(d) had started to show seismic activity, and later began belching gases, fumes and water and began rumbling with
(e) has starting to show some seismic activity, and later began belching gases, fumes and water and rumbled with









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