English Practice Questions For IBPS Clerk Mains 2017

Dear Aspirants,



English Section is a topic that is feared by most of the candidates appearing in the IBPS Clerk Mains Exam. Though the sheer number of concepts and rules may seem intimidating at first, with discipline and the right approach, it is not difficult to master these concepts and their application to questions. Through such English Quizzes for IBPS Clerk and other upcoming exams, we will provide you with all types of high-level questions to ace the questions based on new pattern IBPS Clerk Mains.

DAY-12 Sentence Improvement

Directions (1-5): The following question consists of a passage in which certain phrase/Sentences are printed in bold.  Find out if there is an error in any of the bold part of the sentence, find the correct alternatives to replace those parts from the three options given below each question to make the sentence grammatically correct. If the given sentence is grammatically correct or does not require any correction, choose (e), i.e., “No correction required” as your answer.

Free and compulsory education of children in the 6 to 14 age group in India (1) become a fundamental right when, in 2002, Article 21-A was inserted in the 86th Amendment to the Constitution. This right was to be governed by law, as the state may determine, and the enforcing legislation for this came eight years later, as the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (RTE) Act, 2010, or the RTE Act.
(2) With examples from all around hundred countries which having various and similar pieces of legislation or regulations already in place, there were practices drawn from similar experiences. (3) Since its enactment, the RTE Act has been lauded and disparaged. But there has been a concern not only over its provisions but also about the lacunae in the school education system. However, there are clauses in the Act (4) which has enormous catalytic potential but it have gone largely untouched and unnoticed. A focus on three of these provisions can result in an immediate and discernible impact.
The RTE Act is a game-changer in that it establishes that the onus to ensure free and compulsory education lies on the state. (5) However, the ‘compulsory’ and ‘state liability’ part needs to be imbibed by the educational bureaucracy, which is now lacking.

Q1. 
I. Will become a fundamental right
II. became a fundamental right
III. have became a fundamental right
(a) Only I
(b) Only II
(c) Only III
(d) Only I and II 
(e) No correction required

S1. Ans.(b)
Sol.Option B is the appropriate choice. Past Indefinite tense is required here, For this reason, other options can be eliminated easily.

Q2. 
I. having examples from over a hundred countries having various
II. With examples over from a hundred of the countries having a various
III. With examples from over a hundred countries having various
(a) Only I
(b) Only II
(c) Only III
(d) Only I and II 
(e) No correction required

S2. Ans.(c)
Sol.Option C is the most appropriate choice here. Other options can be ruled out as they are grammatically incorrect.

Q3. 
I. Since its enactment, the RTE Act been lauded and
II. Since their enactment, the RTE Act have been lauded and
III. Since its enactment, the RTE Act will been lauded and
(a) Only I
(b) Only II
(c) Only III
(d) Only I and II 
(e) No correction required

S3. Ans.(e)
Sol. No correction required

Q4. 
I. which had enormous catalytic potential though it
II. which must be having enormous catalytic potential but should
III. which have enormous catalytic potential but that
(a) Only I
(b) Only II
(c) Only III
(d) Only I and II 
(e) No correction required

S4. Ans.(c)
Sol. Option C is the most appropriate choice here.Plural verb "have" is the correct usage.

Q5. 
I. However, the ‘compulsory’ and ‘state liability’ part needs for be imbibe by the educational bureaucracy, which is
II. However, the ‘compulsory’ and ‘state liability’ part needed to be imbibed by the educational bureaucracy, which is then
III. Though, the ‘compulsory’ and ‘state liability’ are the part needs to be imbibed by the educational bureaucracy, which are in turn
(a) Only I
(b) Only II
(c) Only III
(d) Only I and II 
(e) No correction required

S5. Ans.(e)
Sol. No correction required

Directions (6-10): Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below each statement should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct. If the sentence is correct as it is given and No correction is required, mark (e) as the answer.

Q6. Soon after the Tsunami had killed thousands of people along the coasts of southern India, Parliament passes a bill that proposed to set up an institutional mechanism to respond promptly to natural disasters.
(a) passed a bill that proposed
(b) passes a bill with proposed
(c) pass a bill proposing
(d) passed a bill which propose
(e) No correction required

S6. Ans.(a)
Sol. since the sentence is in past tense, 'passed' will be used instead of 'passes'. Thus the bold part will be replaced by 'passed bill that proposed'.

Q7. Denial of wages forced scientists and teachers at the agriculture universities throughout the country to go on strike, crippling crucial research that could help the state of agriculture in the country.
(a) from going on strike
(b) which went on strike
(c) on going for a strike
(d) for going to strike
(e) No correction required

S7. Ans.(e)
Sol. No correction required

Q8. In an attempt to boost their profits many edible oil producing companies have been engaging themselves in propagandas against commonly used oils and promoting exotic and expensive varieties of oils as more healthier options.
(a) as most healthiest options
(b) as less healthy option
(c) as healthier option
(d) as must healthiest option
(e) No correction required

S8. Ans.(c)
Sol. Double comparative (healthier) will not be used together. The best option that will replace the bold part is (c).

Q9. Thanks to numerous government initiatives, rural masses which was earlier unaware of the luxuries of urban ways of living are now connected to the same lifestyle.
(a) who was earlier unaware
(b) which were earlier aware
(c) who were earlier conversant
(d) who were earlier unaware
(e) No correction required

S9. Ans.(d)
Sol. ‘who’ will be used for rural masses and according to its antecedent (rural masses) 'were' will be used instead to 'was'. Thus the bold part will be replaced by 'who were earlier unaware'.

Q10. Over the last few months, while most industries are busy in restructuring operations, cutting costs and firing, the Indian pharmaceutical and healthcare industry was adding manpower and given salary hikes.
(a) as many industries are
(b) while most industries were
(c) while many industries is
(d) where many industries were
(e) No correction required

S10. Ans.(b)
Sol. The sentence is in past tense. Hence 'were' will be used in place of 'are'. Thus the bold part will be replaced by 'while most industries were'.

Directions (11-15): Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c) and (d) given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentences to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct. If the sentence is correct as it is and there is no correction required mark (e) as the answer.

Q11. The supermarkets are falling at themselves to attract customers to their shops.
(a)falling around
(b)falling about
(c)falling on
(d)falling over
(e) No improvement

S11. Ans.(d)
Sol. If you fall over yourself (or fall all over yourself) to do something, you are very keen to do it.

Q12. Your grandmother is coming to visit today, so don't forget to hang around your clothes when you tidy your room.
(a)hang on
(b)hang out
(c)hung up
(d)hang up
(e)No improvement

S12. Ans.(d)
Sol. To hang up something (or hang something up) means to hang something, especially clothes, on a hanger or hook.

Q13. My friends were on holiday in my city, so they looked me on and we all went to a restaurant for a meal.
(a)looked me around
(b)looked me up
(c)looked me at
(d)looked on me
(e)No improvement

S13. Ans.(b)
Sol. To look somebody up (or look up somebody) is to locate and visit someone you have not seen for a long time.

Q14. Don't buy anything from that company: the lady from their customer service department hung out on me last week.
(a)hung up
(b)hanging up
(c)hang at
(d)hang
(e)No improvement

S14. Ans.(a)
Sol.  To hang up means to end a telephone conversation, especially suddenly or unexpectedly.

Q15. My parents were coming to visit this week, but we had to put them away because our heating is broken.
(a)in
(b)on
(c)off
(d)out
(e) No improvement

S15. Ans.(c)
Sol. To put off someone (or put someone off) is to delay seeing them or doing something for them.

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